rsthomason:

For this week’s Art Assignment. I like the teetering almost-unbalanced look of the stack, which echoes the situation described on the spines.

rsthomason:

For this week’s Art Assignment. I like the teetering almost-unbalanced look of the stack, which echoes the situation described on the spines.

prettydancer:

THE ART ASSIGNMENT #13: SORTED BOOKS
I really enjoyed this art assignment, but as a recently moved in college student, I found that I had less books on my hands than usual. I chose to do a self portrait using only the books I brought with me from home, and some of my textbooks. These books already hold special meaning for me, so it felt natural to use them to describe myself.
The first stack reads "Petit Prince, Whatever You Think, Think the Opposite."
The second reads "Radioactive Dance."
{In case you were wondering, the other books are The Perks of Being a Wallflower, Il Piccolo Principe, Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets, and my Focused Inquiry textbook.}
(Michelle Koppl, Sorted Self Portrait)
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prettydancer:

THE ART ASSIGNMENT #13: SORTED BOOKS
I really enjoyed this art assignment, but as a recently moved in college student, I found that I had less books on my hands than usual. I chose to do a self portrait using only the books I brought with me from home, and some of my textbooks. These books already hold special meaning for me, so it felt natural to use them to describe myself.
The first stack reads "Petit Prince, Whatever You Think, Think the Opposite."
The second reads "Radioactive Dance."
{In case you were wondering, the other books are The Perks of Being a Wallflower, Il Piccolo Principe, Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets, and my Focused Inquiry textbook.}
(Michelle Koppl, Sorted Self Portrait)
ZoomInfo
prettydancer:

THE ART ASSIGNMENT #13: SORTED BOOKS
I really enjoyed this art assignment, but as a recently moved in college student, I found that I had less books on my hands than usual. I chose to do a self portrait using only the books I brought with me from home, and some of my textbooks. These books already hold special meaning for me, so it felt natural to use them to describe myself.
The first stack reads "Petit Prince, Whatever You Think, Think the Opposite."
The second reads "Radioactive Dance."
{In case you were wondering, the other books are The Perks of Being a Wallflower, Il Piccolo Principe, Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets, and my Focused Inquiry textbook.}
(Michelle Koppl, Sorted Self Portrait)
ZoomInfo

prettydancer:

THE ART ASSIGNMENT #13: SORTED BOOKS

I really enjoyed this art assignment, but as a recently moved in college student, I found that I had less books on my hands than usual. I chose to do a self portrait using only the books I brought with me from home, and some of my textbooks. These books already hold special meaning for me, so it felt natural to use them to describe myself.

The first stack reads "Petit Prince, Whatever You Think, Think the Opposite."

The second reads "Radioactive Dance."

{In case you were wondering, the other books are The Perks of Being a Wallflower, Il Piccolo Principe, Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets, and my Focused Inquiry textbook.}

(Michelle Koppl, Sorted Self Portrait)

apanoplyofsong:

Following in the vein of my “Walk On It" response, I did the Art Assignment "Imprint" slowly and without many expectations. I finally completed it, using some cut flowers I had been gifted for a recent birthday. I sliced orchids, chrysanthemums, roses, and a carnation sliced in half with a straight blade in several different directions and used three paint colors (red, blue, and green) I happened to have on hand. Before beginning, I thought I would leave the prints relatively separate of one another, but shortly after starting I decided to purposefully overlap them, since so much of the project (such as the shapes created) was out of my control anyway. While I let the occasional one maintain its shape pretty independently, letting it become a busier print left me less room to be overly critical of it.
(Kristen, she, etc.)

apanoplyofsong:

Following in the vein of my “Walk On It" response, I did the Art Assignment "Imprint" slowly and without many expectations. I finally completed it, using some cut flowers I had been gifted for a recent birthday. I sliced orchids, chrysanthemums, roses, and a carnation sliced in half with a straight blade in several different directions and used three paint colors (red, blue, and green) I happened to have on hand. Before beginning, I thought I would leave the prints relatively separate of one another, but shortly after starting I decided to purposefully overlap them, since so much of the project (such as the shapes created) was out of my control anyway. While I let the occasional one maintain its shape pretty independently, letting it become a busier print left me less room to be overly critical of it.

(Kristen, she, etc.)

In which we meet Brooklyn-based artist Nina Katchadourian in Lawrence, Kansas, at the former home of American writer William S. Burroughs (1914 - 1997). Nina takes us on her journey of sorting Burroughs’s book collection and challenges you to sort some books yourself! 

Episode 13 Instructions:

1. Choose a person you know or would like to know better

2. Take a look at/through their library

3. Make 3 stacks of books to develop a portrait of the person

4. Upload it to your social media platform of choice using #theartassignment

5. Fame and glory (your work might be featured in a future episode)

And don’t forget to check out the rest of Nina’s Kansas Cut-Up series. They’re all great, and we only showed you a few. 

Special thanks to The Lawrence Art Center, William Burroughs Communications, Yuri Zupancic, and Tom King, for the assistance in making Nina’s project and this episode happen.

newmuseum:

Texting is tacky. Calling is awkward. Email is old. Next time, try Somebody! This new messaging service by Miranda July launches today, and we’re a hot spot.

This is really rad. I’m signing up. You should, too!

newmuseum:

Texting is tacky. Calling is awkward. Email is old. Next time, try Somebody! This new messaging service by Miranda July launches today, and we’re a hot spot.

This is really rad. I’m signing up. You should, too!

learntolovewell:

I was thinking about the recent art assignment “Under the Influence” and what I wanted to make when I realized I had already done something very similar to this for a photography project in the fall. For my project, I did a series of updated paintings and photographs from throughout art history, ranging from Ancient Roman sculpture, to Renaissance portraiture pairs, to an 18th century landscape, and all the way up to Warhol’s Polaroid portraits. 
Photos in the style of Warhol’s Polaroids were especially fun to shoot because they are so honest and untouched, I didn’t need to edit them down to look like oil paintings, or touch up the imperfections, the imperfections are what they are about. The Polaroids are also close to my heart (and inspiration) because my college owns several hundred Warhol Polaroids and prints through a grant by the Andy Warhol Foundation, and while working in my college gallery I was privileged enough to work with them directly.
Shooting (and editing) in order to emulate Warhol’s style was really fun and an interesting artistic process, and I hope to repeat the practice again under different influences.

This may be my favorite Art Assignment response yet. If you don’t know Warhol’s Polaroids, you should. 
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learntolovewell:

I was thinking about the recent art assignment “Under the Influence” and what I wanted to make when I realized I had already done something very similar to this for a photography project in the fall. For my project, I did a series of updated paintings and photographs from throughout art history, ranging from Ancient Roman sculpture, to Renaissance portraiture pairs, to an 18th century landscape, and all the way up to Warhol’s Polaroid portraits. 
Photos in the style of Warhol’s Polaroids were especially fun to shoot because they are so honest and untouched, I didn’t need to edit them down to look like oil paintings, or touch up the imperfections, the imperfections are what they are about. The Polaroids are also close to my heart (and inspiration) because my college owns several hundred Warhol Polaroids and prints through a grant by the Andy Warhol Foundation, and while working in my college gallery I was privileged enough to work with them directly.
Shooting (and editing) in order to emulate Warhol’s style was really fun and an interesting artistic process, and I hope to repeat the practice again under different influences.

This may be my favorite Art Assignment response yet. If you don’t know Warhol’s Polaroids, you should. 
ZoomInfo

learntolovewell:

I was thinking about the recent art assignment “Under the Influence” and what I wanted to make when I realized I had already done something very similar to this for a photography project in the fall. For my project, I did a series of updated paintings and photographs from throughout art history, ranging from Ancient Roman sculpture, to Renaissance portraiture pairs, to an 18th century landscape, and all the way up to Warhol’s Polaroid portraits. 

Photos in the style of Warhol’s Polaroids were especially fun to shoot because they are so honest and untouched, I didn’t need to edit them down to look like oil paintings, or touch up the imperfections, the imperfections are what they are about. The Polaroids are also close to my heart (and inspiration) because my college owns several hundred Warhol Polaroids and prints through a grant by the Andy Warhol Foundation, and while working in my college gallery I was privileged enough to work with them directly.

Shooting (and editing) in order to emulate Warhol’s style was really fun and an interesting artistic process, and I hope to repeat the practice again under different influences.

This may be my favorite Art Assignment response yet. If you don’t know Warhol’s Polaroids, you should

hkdolman:

I found some old cassette tapes while I was cleaning out my closet yesterday and decided to use one of them for The Art Assignment #12: Imprint.

I couldn’t literally cut it in half, but it wasn’t too hard to take apart, leaving me with the two parts of the plastic case, five screws, two protective pieces of paper, and two spools of tape.

I started off seeing what I could do with all of the different parts, but in the end, the spools of tape were the most fun to work with. I like how the last couple ended up looking like faces, particularly the last one, which to me looks like an adorable owl.

The Art Assignment #12: Imprint: http://youtu.be/-eszUEdj-Hs?list=PLdGqz6dgvIzYgUG9MmGy2N84IED9gA-8W
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hkdolman:

I found some old cassette tapes while I was cleaning out my closet yesterday and decided to use one of them for The Art Assignment #12: Imprint.

I couldn’t literally cut it in half, but it wasn’t too hard to take apart, leaving me with the two parts of the plastic case, five screws, two protective pieces of paper, and two spools of tape.

I started off seeing what I could do with all of the different parts, but in the end, the spools of tape were the most fun to work with. I like how the last couple ended up looking like faces, particularly the last one, which to me looks like an adorable owl.

The Art Assignment #12: Imprint: http://youtu.be/-eszUEdj-Hs?list=PLdGqz6dgvIzYgUG9MmGy2N84IED9gA-8W
ZoomInfo
hkdolman:

I found some old cassette tapes while I was cleaning out my closet yesterday and decided to use one of them for The Art Assignment #12: Imprint.

I couldn’t literally cut it in half, but it wasn’t too hard to take apart, leaving me with the two parts of the plastic case, five screws, two protective pieces of paper, and two spools of tape.

I started off seeing what I could do with all of the different parts, but in the end, the spools of tape were the most fun to work with. I like how the last couple ended up looking like faces, particularly the last one, which to me looks like an adorable owl.

The Art Assignment #12: Imprint: http://youtu.be/-eszUEdj-Hs?list=PLdGqz6dgvIzYgUG9MmGy2N84IED9gA-8W
ZoomInfo
hkdolman:

I found some old cassette tapes while I was cleaning out my closet yesterday and decided to use one of them for The Art Assignment #12: Imprint.

I couldn’t literally cut it in half, but it wasn’t too hard to take apart, leaving me with the two parts of the plastic case, five screws, two protective pieces of paper, and two spools of tape.

I started off seeing what I could do with all of the different parts, but in the end, the spools of tape were the most fun to work with. I like how the last couple ended up looking like faces, particularly the last one, which to me looks like an adorable owl.

The Art Assignment #12: Imprint: http://youtu.be/-eszUEdj-Hs?list=PLdGqz6dgvIzYgUG9MmGy2N84IED9gA-8W
ZoomInfo
hkdolman:

I found some old cassette tapes while I was cleaning out my closet yesterday and decided to use one of them for The Art Assignment #12: Imprint.

I couldn’t literally cut it in half, but it wasn’t too hard to take apart, leaving me with the two parts of the plastic case, five screws, two protective pieces of paper, and two spools of tape.

I started off seeing what I could do with all of the different parts, but in the end, the spools of tape were the most fun to work with. I like how the last couple ended up looking like faces, particularly the last one, which to me looks like an adorable owl.

The Art Assignment #12: Imprint: http://youtu.be/-eszUEdj-Hs?list=PLdGqz6dgvIzYgUG9MmGy2N84IED9gA-8W
ZoomInfo
hkdolman:

I found some old cassette tapes while I was cleaning out my closet yesterday and decided to use one of them for The Art Assignment #12: Imprint.

I couldn’t literally cut it in half, but it wasn’t too hard to take apart, leaving me with the two parts of the plastic case, five screws, two protective pieces of paper, and two spools of tape.

I started off seeing what I could do with all of the different parts, but in the end, the spools of tape were the most fun to work with. I like how the last couple ended up looking like faces, particularly the last one, which to me looks like an adorable owl.

The Art Assignment #12: Imprint: http://youtu.be/-eszUEdj-Hs?list=PLdGqz6dgvIzYgUG9MmGy2N84IED9gA-8W
ZoomInfo
hkdolman:

I found some old cassette tapes while I was cleaning out my closet yesterday and decided to use one of them for The Art Assignment #12: Imprint.

I couldn’t literally cut it in half, but it wasn’t too hard to take apart, leaving me with the two parts of the plastic case, five screws, two protective pieces of paper, and two spools of tape.

I started off seeing what I could do with all of the different parts, but in the end, the spools of tape were the most fun to work with. I like how the last couple ended up looking like faces, particularly the last one, which to me looks like an adorable owl.

The Art Assignment #12: Imprint: http://youtu.be/-eszUEdj-Hs?list=PLdGqz6dgvIzYgUG9MmGy2N84IED9gA-8W
ZoomInfo
hkdolman:

I found some old cassette tapes while I was cleaning out my closet yesterday and decided to use one of them for The Art Assignment #12: Imprint.

I couldn’t literally cut it in half, but it wasn’t too hard to take apart, leaving me with the two parts of the plastic case, five screws, two protective pieces of paper, and two spools of tape.

I started off seeing what I could do with all of the different parts, but in the end, the spools of tape were the most fun to work with. I like how the last couple ended up looking like faces, particularly the last one, which to me looks like an adorable owl.

The Art Assignment #12: Imprint: http://youtu.be/-eszUEdj-Hs?list=PLdGqz6dgvIzYgUG9MmGy2N84IED9gA-8W
ZoomInfo
hkdolman:

I found some old cassette tapes while I was cleaning out my closet yesterday and decided to use one of them for The Art Assignment #12: Imprint.

I couldn’t literally cut it in half, but it wasn’t too hard to take apart, leaving me with the two parts of the plastic case, five screws, two protective pieces of paper, and two spools of tape.

I started off seeing what I could do with all of the different parts, but in the end, the spools of tape were the most fun to work with. I like how the last couple ended up looking like faces, particularly the last one, which to me looks like an adorable owl.

The Art Assignment #12: Imprint: http://youtu.be/-eszUEdj-Hs?list=PLdGqz6dgvIzYgUG9MmGy2N84IED9gA-8W
ZoomInfo

hkdolman:

I found some old cassette tapes while I was cleaning out my closet yesterday and decided to use one of them for The Art Assignment #12: Imprint.

I couldn’t literally cut it in half, but it wasn’t too hard to take apart, leaving me with the two parts of the plastic case, five screws, two protective pieces of paper, and two spools of tape.

I started off seeing what I could do with all of the different parts, but in the end, the spools of tape were the most fun to work with. I like how the last couple ended up looking like faces, particularly the last one, which to me looks like an adorable owl.

The Art Assignment #12: Imprint: http://youtu.be/-eszUEdj-Hs?list=PLdGqz6dgvIzYgUG9MmGy2N84IED9gA-8W

kayquimi:

I guess this isn’t technically me doing an Art Assignment— I didn’t create either of these art pieces myself— but watching Lauren Zoll’s assignment video "Off" made me think of my recent visit to the St. Louis Art Museum, and these two particular installations in their Contemporary Art section. It took me several minutes of staring at the first piece, Frank Stella’s “Marriage of Reason and Squalor”, to confirm that the subtly shifting color was not the paint itself, but the light of the second piece, Dan Flavin’s “untitled”, reflecting off it from an opposite corner of the room. And it was just so fascinating, the way these two separate works of art wind up interacting with each other (and with the viewer, as her moving position between the two changes the angles of the reflections), even though they were made by different artists who likely never anticipated them interacting in such a way, simply by proximity.
ZoomInfo
kayquimi:

I guess this isn’t technically me doing an Art Assignment— I didn’t create either of these art pieces myself— but watching Lauren Zoll’s assignment video "Off" made me think of my recent visit to the St. Louis Art Museum, and these two particular installations in their Contemporary Art section. It took me several minutes of staring at the first piece, Frank Stella’s “Marriage of Reason and Squalor”, to confirm that the subtly shifting color was not the paint itself, but the light of the second piece, Dan Flavin’s “untitled”, reflecting off it from an opposite corner of the room. And it was just so fascinating, the way these two separate works of art wind up interacting with each other (and with the viewer, as her moving position between the two changes the angles of the reflections), even though they were made by different artists who likely never anticipated them interacting in such a way, simply by proximity.
ZoomInfo
kayquimi:

I guess this isn’t technically me doing an Art Assignment— I didn’t create either of these art pieces myself— but watching Lauren Zoll’s assignment video "Off" made me think of my recent visit to the St. Louis Art Museum, and these two particular installations in their Contemporary Art section. It took me several minutes of staring at the first piece, Frank Stella’s “Marriage of Reason and Squalor”, to confirm that the subtly shifting color was not the paint itself, but the light of the second piece, Dan Flavin’s “untitled”, reflecting off it from an opposite corner of the room. And it was just so fascinating, the way these two separate works of art wind up interacting with each other (and with the viewer, as her moving position between the two changes the angles of the reflections), even though they were made by different artists who likely never anticipated them interacting in such a way, simply by proximity.
ZoomInfo
kayquimi:

I guess this isn’t technically me doing an Art Assignment— I didn’t create either of these art pieces myself— but watching Lauren Zoll’s assignment video "Off" made me think of my recent visit to the St. Louis Art Museum, and these two particular installations in their Contemporary Art section. It took me several minutes of staring at the first piece, Frank Stella’s “Marriage of Reason and Squalor”, to confirm that the subtly shifting color was not the paint itself, but the light of the second piece, Dan Flavin’s “untitled”, reflecting off it from an opposite corner of the room. And it was just so fascinating, the way these two separate works of art wind up interacting with each other (and with the viewer, as her moving position between the two changes the angles of the reflections), even though they were made by different artists who likely never anticipated them interacting in such a way, simply by proximity.
ZoomInfo

kayquimi:

I guess this isn’t technically me doing an Art Assignment— I didn’t create either of these art pieces myself— but watching Lauren Zoll’s assignment video "Off" made me think of my recent visit to the St. Louis Art Museum, and these two particular installations in their Contemporary Art section. It took me several minutes of staring at the first piece, Frank Stella’s “Marriage of Reason and Squalor”, to confirm that the subtly shifting color was not the paint itself, but the light of the second piece, Dan Flavin’s “untitled”, reflecting off it from an opposite corner of the room. And it was just so fascinating, the way these two separate works of art wind up interacting with each other (and with the viewer, as her moving position between the two changes the angles of the reflections), even though they were made by different artists who likely never anticipated them interacting in such a way, simply by proximity.

onceuponaspacetime:

Doing some mono printing for @theartassignment ‘Imprint’.
More information and pictures to come later. Pretty proud and excited about this one. (Also extremely excited to be seeing Salman Rushdie’s talk in a couple of weeks!)

onceuponaspacetime:

Doing some mono printing for @theartassignment ‘Imprint’.

More information and pictures to come later. Pretty proud and excited about this one. (Also extremely excited to be seeing Salman Rushdie’s talk in a couple of weeks!)

anywiebs:

Air Guitar by Dave Hickey

I like that this book is the first in The Art Assignment Book Club. I learned a bit and it helped me gain some confidence in a field I rarely feel qualified in. I really enjoy participating in this project and am looking forward to the next book.

Want to see someone do a much better job than we did reviewing Dave Hickey’s Air Guitar? Watch Wiebke! 

(Source: youtube.com)

nanofishology:

Back in 2006, I went on a mission to accumulate ties. The project I had in mind was to stitch them together, side by side, and make a dress out of them. I worked at a thrift store, so I got a discount on the grab bags of ties we put out when they failed to sell individually. However, despite obtaining more than enough to make the dress, I just never got around to making it, and have been hauling around a ton of them for the past 8 years.
When I saw the “Make a Rug” assignment (from theartassignment), I knew I had to do it. Textiles are my babies, and my love for knitting has resulted in needing physical therapy at one point (tension matters, folks!). Initially, I thought about using up some yarn to make my rug. This assignment came out right as I was moving, and when I unearthed my box of ties, I knew what I had to do.
First, I arranged them in a color gradient, then stitched the ends together (skinny end to skinny end). The resulting ball of ties was massive and heavy. I had to start over a few times—the thick-and-thin parts made it very challenging at the beginning. Once I got going, this thing was done in no time. It ended up being smaller than I anticipated, but now I have a very thick, comfy, 99% silk rag rug to sit on in my new living room.
My favorite thing about this project is the modularity. When I move to a bigger space, all I have to do to make a larger rug is buy more ties and add onto the end.
ZoomInfo
nanofishology:

Back in 2006, I went on a mission to accumulate ties. The project I had in mind was to stitch them together, side by side, and make a dress out of them. I worked at a thrift store, so I got a discount on the grab bags of ties we put out when they failed to sell individually. However, despite obtaining more than enough to make the dress, I just never got around to making it, and have been hauling around a ton of them for the past 8 years.
When I saw the “Make a Rug” assignment (from theartassignment), I knew I had to do it. Textiles are my babies, and my love for knitting has resulted in needing physical therapy at one point (tension matters, folks!). Initially, I thought about using up some yarn to make my rug. This assignment came out right as I was moving, and when I unearthed my box of ties, I knew what I had to do.
First, I arranged them in a color gradient, then stitched the ends together (skinny end to skinny end). The resulting ball of ties was massive and heavy. I had to start over a few times—the thick-and-thin parts made it very challenging at the beginning. Once I got going, this thing was done in no time. It ended up being smaller than I anticipated, but now I have a very thick, comfy, 99% silk rag rug to sit on in my new living room.
My favorite thing about this project is the modularity. When I move to a bigger space, all I have to do to make a larger rug is buy more ties and add onto the end.
ZoomInfo
nanofishology:

Back in 2006, I went on a mission to accumulate ties. The project I had in mind was to stitch them together, side by side, and make a dress out of them. I worked at a thrift store, so I got a discount on the grab bags of ties we put out when they failed to sell individually. However, despite obtaining more than enough to make the dress, I just never got around to making it, and have been hauling around a ton of them for the past 8 years.
When I saw the “Make a Rug” assignment (from theartassignment), I knew I had to do it. Textiles are my babies, and my love for knitting has resulted in needing physical therapy at one point (tension matters, folks!). Initially, I thought about using up some yarn to make my rug. This assignment came out right as I was moving, and when I unearthed my box of ties, I knew what I had to do.
First, I arranged them in a color gradient, then stitched the ends together (skinny end to skinny end). The resulting ball of ties was massive and heavy. I had to start over a few times—the thick-and-thin parts made it very challenging at the beginning. Once I got going, this thing was done in no time. It ended up being smaller than I anticipated, but now I have a very thick, comfy, 99% silk rag rug to sit on in my new living room.
My favorite thing about this project is the modularity. When I move to a bigger space, all I have to do to make a larger rug is buy more ties and add onto the end.
ZoomInfo
nanofishology:

Back in 2006, I went on a mission to accumulate ties. The project I had in mind was to stitch them together, side by side, and make a dress out of them. I worked at a thrift store, so I got a discount on the grab bags of ties we put out when they failed to sell individually. However, despite obtaining more than enough to make the dress, I just never got around to making it, and have been hauling around a ton of them for the past 8 years.
When I saw the “Make a Rug” assignment (from theartassignment), I knew I had to do it. Textiles are my babies, and my love for knitting has resulted in needing physical therapy at one point (tension matters, folks!). Initially, I thought about using up some yarn to make my rug. This assignment came out right as I was moving, and when I unearthed my box of ties, I knew what I had to do.
First, I arranged them in a color gradient, then stitched the ends together (skinny end to skinny end). The resulting ball of ties was massive and heavy. I had to start over a few times—the thick-and-thin parts made it very challenging at the beginning. Once I got going, this thing was done in no time. It ended up being smaller than I anticipated, but now I have a very thick, comfy, 99% silk rag rug to sit on in my new living room.
My favorite thing about this project is the modularity. When I move to a bigger space, all I have to do to make a larger rug is buy more ties and add onto the end.
ZoomInfo
nanofishology:

Back in 2006, I went on a mission to accumulate ties. The project I had in mind was to stitch them together, side by side, and make a dress out of them. I worked at a thrift store, so I got a discount on the grab bags of ties we put out when they failed to sell individually. However, despite obtaining more than enough to make the dress, I just never got around to making it, and have been hauling around a ton of them for the past 8 years.
When I saw the “Make a Rug” assignment (from theartassignment), I knew I had to do it. Textiles are my babies, and my love for knitting has resulted in needing physical therapy at one point (tension matters, folks!). Initially, I thought about using up some yarn to make my rug. This assignment came out right as I was moving, and when I unearthed my box of ties, I knew what I had to do.
First, I arranged them in a color gradient, then stitched the ends together (skinny end to skinny end). The resulting ball of ties was massive and heavy. I had to start over a few times—the thick-and-thin parts made it very challenging at the beginning. Once I got going, this thing was done in no time. It ended up being smaller than I anticipated, but now I have a very thick, comfy, 99% silk rag rug to sit on in my new living room.
My favorite thing about this project is the modularity. When I move to a bigger space, all I have to do to make a larger rug is buy more ties and add onto the end.
ZoomInfo
nanofishology:

Back in 2006, I went on a mission to accumulate ties. The project I had in mind was to stitch them together, side by side, and make a dress out of them. I worked at a thrift store, so I got a discount on the grab bags of ties we put out when they failed to sell individually. However, despite obtaining more than enough to make the dress, I just never got around to making it, and have been hauling around a ton of them for the past 8 years.
When I saw the “Make a Rug” assignment (from theartassignment), I knew I had to do it. Textiles are my babies, and my love for knitting has resulted in needing physical therapy at one point (tension matters, folks!). Initially, I thought about using up some yarn to make my rug. This assignment came out right as I was moving, and when I unearthed my box of ties, I knew what I had to do.
First, I arranged them in a color gradient, then stitched the ends together (skinny end to skinny end). The resulting ball of ties was massive and heavy. I had to start over a few times—the thick-and-thin parts made it very challenging at the beginning. Once I got going, this thing was done in no time. It ended up being smaller than I anticipated, but now I have a very thick, comfy, 99% silk rag rug to sit on in my new living room.
My favorite thing about this project is the modularity. When I move to a bigger space, all I have to do to make a larger rug is buy more ties and add onto the end.
ZoomInfo

nanofishology:

Back in 2006, I went on a mission to accumulate ties. The project I had in mind was to stitch them together, side by side, and make a dress out of them. I worked at a thrift store, so I got a discount on the grab bags of ties we put out when they failed to sell individually. However, despite obtaining more than enough to make the dress, I just never got around to making it, and have been hauling around a ton of them for the past 8 years.

When I saw the “Make a Rug” assignment (from theartassignment), I knew I had to do it. Textiles are my babies, and my love for knitting has resulted in needing physical therapy at one point (tension matters, folks!). Initially, I thought about using up some yarn to make my rug. This assignment came out right as I was moving, and when I unearthed my box of ties, I knew what I had to do.

First, I arranged them in a color gradient, then stitched the ends together (skinny end to skinny end). The resulting ball of ties was massive and heavy. I had to start over a few times—the thick-and-thin parts made it very challenging at the beginning. Once I got going, this thing was done in no time. It ended up being smaller than I anticipated, but now I have a very thick, comfy, 99% silk rag rug to sit on in my new living room.

My favorite thing about this project is the modularity. When I move to a bigger space, all I have to do to make a larger rug is buy more ties and add onto the end.

nikki-rook:

When I was waiting for a photo opportunity to happen I was suddenly inspired by the art assignment Off. A little different than an electronic device, but the same way you can get stuck behind a phone or computer, you can get stuck behind a camera. So I took this, and the blurred reflection of lights looked the best out several photos.

Wow—super nice Off execution. In a camera lens!

nikki-rook:

When I was waiting for a photo opportunity to happen I was suddenly inspired by the art assignment Off. A little different than an electronic device, but the same way you can get stuck behind a phone or computer, you can get stuck behind a camera. So I took this, and the blurred reflection of lights looked the best out several photos.

Wow—super nice Off execution. In a camera lens!