space-munchies:

Art Assignment #16 ‘Desktop Monument’
The landscape/image I worked with to create this sculpture was:

It is a mangrove forest in Mardja, Near Cape Tribulation, WA, Australia.
I found the image on this blog post. The blog was useful for giving me a feel for the place.
I have used masking tape along with a couple of other tapes to make my sculpture. The sticky side is facing outward - so the work is sticky to touch. I decided to do this because I imagine the swampland and mud to be sticky in a way. I chose to use a variety of tapes to represent the idea that there is a lot of different plant life there (mentioned in the blog post).
One thing I think I haven’t quite achieved here is the sort of grimness of the landscape (also talked about in the landscape). This may be due to lighting, but I think is mostly because the masking tape is light in colour (sort of a cream colour). I did use tapes that are darker too, but the cream makes up the bulk of it.
My only references were the image and the section of the blog post that talks about it.
After creating the work I looked up more pictures of the area. Other pictures of this swamp/mangrove forest don’t look as grim or dark. I’d like to have a go at doing an alternate version using this image as my main inspiration. It might not be that different, but I’d like to give it a try (if I have time! I do have exams coming up).
Because my sculpture is stuck to my desk and the bottom of my computer monitor I will have to dismantle it soon. But I’ll see if I can leave it there for a day or two.
I’m pretty happy with how this has turned out. The overall aesthetic isn’t what I originally had in mind, but still a good result. It was really fun to create.

Great use of materials! If you’ve managed to keep it on your desk, I think your instinct is right to try it in different lighting environments. 
ZoomInfo
space-munchies:

Art Assignment #16 ‘Desktop Monument’
The landscape/image I worked with to create this sculpture was:

It is a mangrove forest in Mardja, Near Cape Tribulation, WA, Australia.
I found the image on this blog post. The blog was useful for giving me a feel for the place.
I have used masking tape along with a couple of other tapes to make my sculpture. The sticky side is facing outward - so the work is sticky to touch. I decided to do this because I imagine the swampland and mud to be sticky in a way. I chose to use a variety of tapes to represent the idea that there is a lot of different plant life there (mentioned in the blog post).
One thing I think I haven’t quite achieved here is the sort of grimness of the landscape (also talked about in the landscape). This may be due to lighting, but I think is mostly because the masking tape is light in colour (sort of a cream colour). I did use tapes that are darker too, but the cream makes up the bulk of it.
My only references were the image and the section of the blog post that talks about it.
After creating the work I looked up more pictures of the area. Other pictures of this swamp/mangrove forest don’t look as grim or dark. I’d like to have a go at doing an alternate version using this image as my main inspiration. It might not be that different, but I’d like to give it a try (if I have time! I do have exams coming up).
Because my sculpture is stuck to my desk and the bottom of my computer monitor I will have to dismantle it soon. But I’ll see if I can leave it there for a day or two.
I’m pretty happy with how this has turned out. The overall aesthetic isn’t what I originally had in mind, but still a good result. It was really fun to create.

Great use of materials! If you’ve managed to keep it on your desk, I think your instinct is right to try it in different lighting environments. 
ZoomInfo
space-munchies:

Art Assignment #16 ‘Desktop Monument’
The landscape/image I worked with to create this sculpture was:

It is a mangrove forest in Mardja, Near Cape Tribulation, WA, Australia.
I found the image on this blog post. The blog was useful for giving me a feel for the place.
I have used masking tape along with a couple of other tapes to make my sculpture. The sticky side is facing outward - so the work is sticky to touch. I decided to do this because I imagine the swampland and mud to be sticky in a way. I chose to use a variety of tapes to represent the idea that there is a lot of different plant life there (mentioned in the blog post).
One thing I think I haven’t quite achieved here is the sort of grimness of the landscape (also talked about in the landscape). This may be due to lighting, but I think is mostly because the masking tape is light in colour (sort of a cream colour). I did use tapes that are darker too, but the cream makes up the bulk of it.
My only references were the image and the section of the blog post that talks about it.
After creating the work I looked up more pictures of the area. Other pictures of this swamp/mangrove forest don’t look as grim or dark. I’d like to have a go at doing an alternate version using this image as my main inspiration. It might not be that different, but I’d like to give it a try (if I have time! I do have exams coming up).
Because my sculpture is stuck to my desk and the bottom of my computer monitor I will have to dismantle it soon. But I’ll see if I can leave it there for a day or two.
I’m pretty happy with how this has turned out. The overall aesthetic isn’t what I originally had in mind, but still a good result. It was really fun to create.

Great use of materials! If you’ve managed to keep it on your desk, I think your instinct is right to try it in different lighting environments. 
ZoomInfo
space-munchies:

Art Assignment #16 ‘Desktop Monument’
The landscape/image I worked with to create this sculpture was:

It is a mangrove forest in Mardja, Near Cape Tribulation, WA, Australia.
I found the image on this blog post. The blog was useful for giving me a feel for the place.
I have used masking tape along with a couple of other tapes to make my sculpture. The sticky side is facing outward - so the work is sticky to touch. I decided to do this because I imagine the swampland and mud to be sticky in a way. I chose to use a variety of tapes to represent the idea that there is a lot of different plant life there (mentioned in the blog post).
One thing I think I haven’t quite achieved here is the sort of grimness of the landscape (also talked about in the landscape). This may be due to lighting, but I think is mostly because the masking tape is light in colour (sort of a cream colour). I did use tapes that are darker too, but the cream makes up the bulk of it.
My only references were the image and the section of the blog post that talks about it.
After creating the work I looked up more pictures of the area. Other pictures of this swamp/mangrove forest don’t look as grim or dark. I’d like to have a go at doing an alternate version using this image as my main inspiration. It might not be that different, but I’d like to give it a try (if I have time! I do have exams coming up).
Because my sculpture is stuck to my desk and the bottom of my computer monitor I will have to dismantle it soon. But I’ll see if I can leave it there for a day or two.
I’m pretty happy with how this has turned out. The overall aesthetic isn’t what I originally had in mind, but still a good result. It was really fun to create.

Great use of materials! If you’ve managed to keep it on your desk, I think your instinct is right to try it in different lighting environments. 
ZoomInfo
space-munchies:

Art Assignment #16 ‘Desktop Monument’
The landscape/image I worked with to create this sculpture was:

It is a mangrove forest in Mardja, Near Cape Tribulation, WA, Australia.
I found the image on this blog post. The blog was useful for giving me a feel for the place.
I have used masking tape along with a couple of other tapes to make my sculpture. The sticky side is facing outward - so the work is sticky to touch. I decided to do this because I imagine the swampland and mud to be sticky in a way. I chose to use a variety of tapes to represent the idea that there is a lot of different plant life there (mentioned in the blog post).
One thing I think I haven’t quite achieved here is the sort of grimness of the landscape (also talked about in the landscape). This may be due to lighting, but I think is mostly because the masking tape is light in colour (sort of a cream colour). I did use tapes that are darker too, but the cream makes up the bulk of it.
My only references were the image and the section of the blog post that talks about it.
After creating the work I looked up more pictures of the area. Other pictures of this swamp/mangrove forest don’t look as grim or dark. I’d like to have a go at doing an alternate version using this image as my main inspiration. It might not be that different, but I’d like to give it a try (if I have time! I do have exams coming up).
Because my sculpture is stuck to my desk and the bottom of my computer monitor I will have to dismantle it soon. But I’ll see if I can leave it there for a day or two.
I’m pretty happy with how this has turned out. The overall aesthetic isn’t what I originally had in mind, but still a good result. It was really fun to create.

Great use of materials! If you’ve managed to keep it on your desk, I think your instinct is right to try it in different lighting environments. 
ZoomInfo
space-munchies:

Art Assignment #16 ‘Desktop Monument’
The landscape/image I worked with to create this sculpture was:

It is a mangrove forest in Mardja, Near Cape Tribulation, WA, Australia.
I found the image on this blog post. The blog was useful for giving me a feel for the place.
I have used masking tape along with a couple of other tapes to make my sculpture. The sticky side is facing outward - so the work is sticky to touch. I decided to do this because I imagine the swampland and mud to be sticky in a way. I chose to use a variety of tapes to represent the idea that there is a lot of different plant life there (mentioned in the blog post).
One thing I think I haven’t quite achieved here is the sort of grimness of the landscape (also talked about in the landscape). This may be due to lighting, but I think is mostly because the masking tape is light in colour (sort of a cream colour). I did use tapes that are darker too, but the cream makes up the bulk of it.
My only references were the image and the section of the blog post that talks about it.
After creating the work I looked up more pictures of the area. Other pictures of this swamp/mangrove forest don’t look as grim or dark. I’d like to have a go at doing an alternate version using this image as my main inspiration. It might not be that different, but I’d like to give it a try (if I have time! I do have exams coming up).
Because my sculpture is stuck to my desk and the bottom of my computer monitor I will have to dismantle it soon. But I’ll see if I can leave it there for a day or two.
I’m pretty happy with how this has turned out. The overall aesthetic isn’t what I originally had in mind, but still a good result. It was really fun to create.

Great use of materials! If you’ve managed to keep it on your desk, I think your instinct is right to try it in different lighting environments. 
ZoomInfo

space-munchies:

Art Assignment #16 ‘Desktop Monument

The landscape/image I worked with to create this sculpture was:

It is a mangrove forest in Mardja, Near Cape Tribulation, WA, Australia.

I found the image on this blog post. The blog was useful for giving me a feel for the place.

I have used masking tape along with a couple of other tapes to make my sculpture. The sticky side is facing outward - so the work is sticky to touch. I decided to do this because I imagine the swampland and mud to be sticky in a way. I chose to use a variety of tapes to represent the idea that there is a lot of different plant life there (mentioned in the blog post).

One thing I think I haven’t quite achieved here is the sort of grimness of the landscape (also talked about in the landscape). This may be due to lighting, but I think is mostly because the masking tape is light in colour (sort of a cream colour). I did use tapes that are darker too, but the cream makes up the bulk of it.

My only references were the image and the section of the blog post that talks about it.

After creating the work I looked up more pictures of the area. Other pictures of this swamp/mangrove forest don’t look as grim or dark. I’d like to have a go at doing an alternate version using this image as my main inspiration. It might not be that different, but I’d like to give it a try (if I have time! I do have exams coming up).

Because my sculpture is stuck to my desk and the bottom of my computer monitor I will have to dismantle it soon. But I’ll see if I can leave it there for a day or two.

I’m pretty happy with how this has turned out. The overall aesthetic isn’t what I originally had in mind, but still a good result. It was really fun to create.

Great use of materials! If you’ve managed to keep it on your desk, I think your instinct is right to try it in different lighting environments. 

yes4poe:

"canyon"             episode 16 desktop monument
I never went to the Grand Canyon. I have always wanted to go.
This is from my paper cutouts, put into a photo collage, that are Matisse influenced.
I think this is more desktop wallpaper than monument, but it is still creating a nature scene that I have never been to but visioned. 

yes4poe:

"canyon"             episode 16 desktop monument

I never went to the Grand Canyon. I have always wanted to go.

This is from my paper cutouts, put into a photo collage, that are Matisse influenced.

I think this is more desktop wallpaper than monument, but it is still creating a nature scene that I have never been to but visioned. 

unnestedmatryoshka:

The surface of the moon is a setting, sadly, I’ve never seen first hand. You asked us to capture the experience of being in that setting rather than just the look of it.
When they first landed on the moon, they weren’t sure how solid the ground would be. I mean you know it is a solid, but how solid is it? To me that is like a little kid standing at the edge of a ball pit thinking, “the adults told me I’d be okay if I stepped into this, but it looks like it is just going to swallow me whole.”
I used ball pitt balls, bouncy balls, ping pong balls, and golf balls to create a rolling landscape. Two things that pleasantly surprised me were the light reflecting off the balls (like sunlight off of moon) and the heavy bouncy balls shifting things and creating little concentrations (the moon has mass concentrations—mascons for short).
I’ll also post a quick video that simulates hopping around in the pitt.

Really excellent response to Lee Boroson’s Desktop Monument assignment to get the ball rolling (sorry). This articulation is extremely visceral for me—I immediately recall that feeling in the ball pit—and I really appreciate how quickly and effectively this takes me to that feeling of uncertainty. 
ZoomInfo
unnestedmatryoshka:

The surface of the moon is a setting, sadly, I’ve never seen first hand. You asked us to capture the experience of being in that setting rather than just the look of it.
When they first landed on the moon, they weren’t sure how solid the ground would be. I mean you know it is a solid, but how solid is it? To me that is like a little kid standing at the edge of a ball pit thinking, “the adults told me I’d be okay if I stepped into this, but it looks like it is just going to swallow me whole.”
I used ball pitt balls, bouncy balls, ping pong balls, and golf balls to create a rolling landscape. Two things that pleasantly surprised me were the light reflecting off the balls (like sunlight off of moon) and the heavy bouncy balls shifting things and creating little concentrations (the moon has mass concentrations—mascons for short).
I’ll also post a quick video that simulates hopping around in the pitt.

Really excellent response to Lee Boroson’s Desktop Monument assignment to get the ball rolling (sorry). This articulation is extremely visceral for me—I immediately recall that feeling in the ball pit—and I really appreciate how quickly and effectively this takes me to that feeling of uncertainty. 
ZoomInfo
unnestedmatryoshka:

The surface of the moon is a setting, sadly, I’ve never seen first hand. You asked us to capture the experience of being in that setting rather than just the look of it.
When they first landed on the moon, they weren’t sure how solid the ground would be. I mean you know it is a solid, but how solid is it? To me that is like a little kid standing at the edge of a ball pit thinking, “the adults told me I’d be okay if I stepped into this, but it looks like it is just going to swallow me whole.”
I used ball pitt balls, bouncy balls, ping pong balls, and golf balls to create a rolling landscape. Two things that pleasantly surprised me were the light reflecting off the balls (like sunlight off of moon) and the heavy bouncy balls shifting things and creating little concentrations (the moon has mass concentrations—mascons for short).
I’ll also post a quick video that simulates hopping around in the pitt.

Really excellent response to Lee Boroson’s Desktop Monument assignment to get the ball rolling (sorry). This articulation is extremely visceral for me—I immediately recall that feeling in the ball pit—and I really appreciate how quickly and effectively this takes me to that feeling of uncertainty. 
ZoomInfo
unnestedmatryoshka:

The surface of the moon is a setting, sadly, I’ve never seen first hand. You asked us to capture the experience of being in that setting rather than just the look of it.
When they first landed on the moon, they weren’t sure how solid the ground would be. I mean you know it is a solid, but how solid is it? To me that is like a little kid standing at the edge of a ball pit thinking, “the adults told me I’d be okay if I stepped into this, but it looks like it is just going to swallow me whole.”
I used ball pitt balls, bouncy balls, ping pong balls, and golf balls to create a rolling landscape. Two things that pleasantly surprised me were the light reflecting off the balls (like sunlight off of moon) and the heavy bouncy balls shifting things and creating little concentrations (the moon has mass concentrations—mascons for short).
I’ll also post a quick video that simulates hopping around in the pitt.

Really excellent response to Lee Boroson’s Desktop Monument assignment to get the ball rolling (sorry). This articulation is extremely visceral for me—I immediately recall that feeling in the ball pit—and I really appreciate how quickly and effectively this takes me to that feeling of uncertainty. 
ZoomInfo
unnestedmatryoshka:

The surface of the moon is a setting, sadly, I’ve never seen first hand. You asked us to capture the experience of being in that setting rather than just the look of it.
When they first landed on the moon, they weren’t sure how solid the ground would be. I mean you know it is a solid, but how solid is it? To me that is like a little kid standing at the edge of a ball pit thinking, “the adults told me I’d be okay if I stepped into this, but it looks like it is just going to swallow me whole.”
I used ball pitt balls, bouncy balls, ping pong balls, and golf balls to create a rolling landscape. Two things that pleasantly surprised me were the light reflecting off the balls (like sunlight off of moon) and the heavy bouncy balls shifting things and creating little concentrations (the moon has mass concentrations—mascons for short).
I’ll also post a quick video that simulates hopping around in the pitt.

Really excellent response to Lee Boroson’s Desktop Monument assignment to get the ball rolling (sorry). This articulation is extremely visceral for me—I immediately recall that feeling in the ball pit—and I really appreciate how quickly and effectively this takes me to that feeling of uncertainty. 
ZoomInfo
unnestedmatryoshka:

The surface of the moon is a setting, sadly, I’ve never seen first hand. You asked us to capture the experience of being in that setting rather than just the look of it.
When they first landed on the moon, they weren’t sure how solid the ground would be. I mean you know it is a solid, but how solid is it? To me that is like a little kid standing at the edge of a ball pit thinking, “the adults told me I’d be okay if I stepped into this, but it looks like it is just going to swallow me whole.”
I used ball pitt balls, bouncy balls, ping pong balls, and golf balls to create a rolling landscape. Two things that pleasantly surprised me were the light reflecting off the balls (like sunlight off of moon) and the heavy bouncy balls shifting things and creating little concentrations (the moon has mass concentrations—mascons for short).
I’ll also post a quick video that simulates hopping around in the pitt.

Really excellent response to Lee Boroson’s Desktop Monument assignment to get the ball rolling (sorry). This articulation is extremely visceral for me—I immediately recall that feeling in the ball pit—and I really appreciate how quickly and effectively this takes me to that feeling of uncertainty. 
ZoomInfo

unnestedmatryoshka:

The surface of the moon is a setting, sadly, I’ve never seen first hand. You asked us to capture the experience of being in that setting rather than just the look of it.

When they first landed on the moon, they weren’t sure how solid the ground would be. I mean you know it is a solid, but how solid is it? To me that is like a little kid standing at the edge of a ball pit thinking, “the adults told me I’d be okay if I stepped into this, but it looks like it is just going to swallow me whole.”

I used ball pitt balls, bouncy balls, ping pong balls, and golf balls to create a rolling landscape. Two things that pleasantly surprised me were the light reflecting off the balls (like sunlight off of moon) and the heavy bouncy balls shifting things and creating little concentrations (the moon has mass concentrations—mascons for short).

I’ll also post a quick video that simulates hopping around in the pitt.

Really excellent response to Lee Boroson’s Desktop Monument assignment to get the ball rolling (sorry). This articulation is extremely visceral for me—I immediately recall that feeling in the ball pit—and I really appreciate how quickly and effectively this takes me to that feeling of uncertainty. 

So you think you want to work in a museum... http://whenyouworkatamuseum.com/post/97568768392/so-you-think-you-want-to-work-in-a-museum

whenyouworkatamuseum:

A couple of months ago, I asked you guys to help me crowd-source a museum-career-advice column. Several times a week, I get emails from people who want to work in a museum asking me how to get their foot in the door, or how to succeed in a museum career, so I thought a crowd-sourced advice column…

Great advice. There is no one path to working in a museum. There are more- and less-common paths, but it’s super important to remember there’s more than one way to get there. AND super important to have diverse skills and interests— museum studies alone will likely not get you there. 

learntolovewell:

Thinking about @theartassignment and nina katchadourian’s sorted books tonight and how, in the end, we all just wish to make good art. #theartassignment #sortedbooks

Amen. 

learntolovewell:

Thinking about @theartassignment and nina katchadourian’s sorted books tonight and how, in the end, we all just wish to make good art. #theartassignment #sortedbooks

Amen. 

livingonthenorthatlantic:

A response to the Art Assignment ep. 13. I did this at school before everyone arrived, so I used the school’s library for the books, and the Faroe Islands, whaling , and the North Atlantic in general as my “person”. The second and third stacks are specific to the Faroes, and the first is more specific to Greenland, and a little about the Arctic in general. The Faroes are remote and not many people know about them, which is part of why I made a stack about them. I also thought it was important to make a stack about them for myself, because even though I’ve lived here for a few months myself, there’s still a lot to learn. The third stack is the one I think that is the most important to me. I think it sums up a lot of the debate about whaling here pretty concisely. I read both books, and they were both interesting/educating and helped me solidify a lot of what I thought about whaling. The books in the first stack are both about Greenland. The first book is about American and British whalers coming to Greenland in the 19th and early 20th centuries and how that changed people’s lives.The second book is about the first 10 years after Greenland got home rule from Denmark. I thought it was interesting how the titles fit together to create a story that was about Greenland but also about other parts of the Arctic.
The books I used were:
Highlights of an Arctic Revolution: The First 120 Months of Greenlandic Home Rule, Namminersornerullutik Oqartussat, 
The Faroe Islands: Interpretations of History, Jonathan Wylie
 When the Whalers were Up North, Dorothy Harley Eber
Pilot Whaling in the Faroe Islands, Jóan Pauli Joensen
Arctic Wars,Animal Rights, Endangered Peoples, Finn Lynge
Living on the North Atlantic, multiple authors, from an exhibition put on by museums in Norway, Iceland, Spain, and France.
ZoomInfo
livingonthenorthatlantic:

A response to the Art Assignment ep. 13. I did this at school before everyone arrived, so I used the school’s library for the books, and the Faroe Islands, whaling , and the North Atlantic in general as my “person”. The second and third stacks are specific to the Faroes, and the first is more specific to Greenland, and a little about the Arctic in general. The Faroes are remote and not many people know about them, which is part of why I made a stack about them. I also thought it was important to make a stack about them for myself, because even though I’ve lived here for a few months myself, there’s still a lot to learn. The third stack is the one I think that is the most important to me. I think it sums up a lot of the debate about whaling here pretty concisely. I read both books, and they were both interesting/educating and helped me solidify a lot of what I thought about whaling. The books in the first stack are both about Greenland. The first book is about American and British whalers coming to Greenland in the 19th and early 20th centuries and how that changed people’s lives.The second book is about the first 10 years after Greenland got home rule from Denmark. I thought it was interesting how the titles fit together to create a story that was about Greenland but also about other parts of the Arctic.
The books I used were:
Highlights of an Arctic Revolution: The First 120 Months of Greenlandic Home Rule, Namminersornerullutik Oqartussat, 
The Faroe Islands: Interpretations of History, Jonathan Wylie
 When the Whalers were Up North, Dorothy Harley Eber
Pilot Whaling in the Faroe Islands, Jóan Pauli Joensen
Arctic Wars,Animal Rights, Endangered Peoples, Finn Lynge
Living on the North Atlantic, multiple authors, from an exhibition put on by museums in Norway, Iceland, Spain, and France.
ZoomInfo
livingonthenorthatlantic:

A response to the Art Assignment ep. 13. I did this at school before everyone arrived, so I used the school’s library for the books, and the Faroe Islands, whaling , and the North Atlantic in general as my “person”. The second and third stacks are specific to the Faroes, and the first is more specific to Greenland, and a little about the Arctic in general. The Faroes are remote and not many people know about them, which is part of why I made a stack about them. I also thought it was important to make a stack about them for myself, because even though I’ve lived here for a few months myself, there’s still a lot to learn. The third stack is the one I think that is the most important to me. I think it sums up a lot of the debate about whaling here pretty concisely. I read both books, and they were both interesting/educating and helped me solidify a lot of what I thought about whaling. The books in the first stack are both about Greenland. The first book is about American and British whalers coming to Greenland in the 19th and early 20th centuries and how that changed people’s lives.The second book is about the first 10 years after Greenland got home rule from Denmark. I thought it was interesting how the titles fit together to create a story that was about Greenland but also about other parts of the Arctic.
The books I used were:
Highlights of an Arctic Revolution: The First 120 Months of Greenlandic Home Rule, Namminersornerullutik Oqartussat, 
The Faroe Islands: Interpretations of History, Jonathan Wylie
 When the Whalers were Up North, Dorothy Harley Eber
Pilot Whaling in the Faroe Islands, Jóan Pauli Joensen
Arctic Wars,Animal Rights, Endangered Peoples, Finn Lynge
Living on the North Atlantic, multiple authors, from an exhibition put on by museums in Norway, Iceland, Spain, and France.
ZoomInfo

livingonthenorthatlantic:

A response to the Art Assignment ep. 13. I did this at school before everyone arrived, so I used the school’s library for the books, and the Faroe Islands, whaling , and the North Atlantic in general as my “person”. The second and third stacks are specific to the Faroes, and the first is more specific to Greenland, and a little about the Arctic in general. The Faroes are remote and not many people know about them, which is part of why I made a stack about them. I also thought it was important to make a stack about them for myself, because even though I’ve lived here for a few months myself, there’s still a lot to learn. The third stack is the one I think that is the most important to me. I think it sums up a lot of the debate about whaling here pretty concisely. I read both books, and they were both interesting/educating and helped me solidify a lot of what I thought about whaling. The books in the first stack are both about Greenland. The first book is about American and British whalers coming to Greenland in the 19th and early 20th centuries and how that changed people’s lives.The second book is about the first 10 years after Greenland got home rule from Denmark. I thought it was interesting how the titles fit together to create a story that was about Greenland but also about other parts of the Arctic.

The books I used were:

Highlights of an Arctic Revolution: The First 120 Months of Greenlandic Home Rule, Namminersornerullutik Oqartussat, 

The Faroe Islands: Interpretations of History, Jonathan Wylie

 When the Whalers were Up North, Dorothy Harley Eber

Pilot Whaling in the Faroe Islands, Jóan Pauli Joensen

Arctic Wars,Animal Rights, Endangered Peoples, Finn Lynge

Living on the North Atlantic, multiple authors, from an exhibition put on by museums in Norway, Iceland, Spain, and France.

otherinfinitiesuniverse:

theartassignment
Photo 1  The elements of great managing Knock your socks off service It’s yours ship Success built to last
Photo 2 The flip side The one thing you need to know Managing knock your socks off service It’s your ship
I chose to sort my brothers books. He is a manager of a store so he has quite a bit of managing books.
ZoomInfo
otherinfinitiesuniverse:

theartassignment
Photo 1  The elements of great managing Knock your socks off service It’s yours ship Success built to last
Photo 2 The flip side The one thing you need to know Managing knock your socks off service It’s your ship
I chose to sort my brothers books. He is a manager of a store so he has quite a bit of managing books.
ZoomInfo

otherinfinitiesuniverse:

theartassignment

Photo 1 
The elements of great managing
Knock your socks off service
It’s yours ship
Success built to last

Photo 2
The flip side
The one thing you need to know
Managing knock your socks off service
It’s your ship

I chose to sort my brothers books. He is a manager of a store so he has quite a bit of managing books.

lifays:

Self-portrait by LifayMade for The Art Assignment 13: Sorted Books
Comment:
1. EUROPEAlbert Camus - La Peste;Charles Dickens - Hard Times;Yann Martel - Life of Pi Schiffbruch mit Tiger;
2. INFLUENCE & IDENTITYGottfried Keller - Kleider machen Leute;Bernard Shaw - Pygmalion;Friedrich Schiller - Maria Stuart;
3. SCIENCEStöckner - Taschenbuch der Physik;Lindner - Physikalische Aufgaben;Lehr- und Übungsbuch der Mathematik I - III.;
ZoomInfo
lifays:

Self-portrait by LifayMade for The Art Assignment 13: Sorted Books
Comment:
1. EUROPEAlbert Camus - La Peste;Charles Dickens - Hard Times;Yann Martel - Life of Pi Schiffbruch mit Tiger;
2. INFLUENCE & IDENTITYGottfried Keller - Kleider machen Leute;Bernard Shaw - Pygmalion;Friedrich Schiller - Maria Stuart;
3. SCIENCEStöckner - Taschenbuch der Physik;Lindner - Physikalische Aufgaben;Lehr- und Übungsbuch der Mathematik I - III.;
ZoomInfo
lifays:

Self-portrait by LifayMade for The Art Assignment 13: Sorted Books
Comment:
1. EUROPEAlbert Camus - La Peste;Charles Dickens - Hard Times;Yann Martel - Life of Pi Schiffbruch mit Tiger;
2. INFLUENCE & IDENTITYGottfried Keller - Kleider machen Leute;Bernard Shaw - Pygmalion;Friedrich Schiller - Maria Stuart;
3. SCIENCEStöckner - Taschenbuch der Physik;Lindner - Physikalische Aufgaben;Lehr- und Übungsbuch der Mathematik I - III.;
ZoomInfo

lifays:

Self-portrait by Lifay

Made for The Art Assignment 13: Sorted Books

Comment:

1. EUROPE
Albert Camus - La Peste;
Charles Dickens - Hard Times;
Yann Martel - Life of Pi Schiffbruch mit Tiger;

2. INFLUENCE & IDENTITY
Gottfried Keller - Kleider machen Leute;
Bernard Shaw - Pygmalion;
Friedrich Schiller - Maria Stuart;

3. SCIENCE
Stöckner - Taschenbuch der Physik;
Lindner - Physikalische Aufgaben;
Lehr- und Übungsbuch der Mathematik I - III.;

steakuccino:

In this video, I complete The Art Assignment’s Sorted Books assignment, which is #13 in their series.

Many, many thanks to Sanne Vliegenthart, booksandquills, who let me use her library!

Check out The Art Assignment
Check out Sanne

I am social:
Twits
Grams
Tumbls
Reads

Proving that you really don’t need to have the physical books of your subject NOR live in the same continent as they. This was really wonderful. Thanks for showing us your process. 

lyriclorelei:

Sorted Books, Part II
Decided to not only make poems with friends’ books, but also my own for the Thirteenth Art Assignment.
1.The Ultimate Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy by Douglas Adams2001, A Space Odyssey by Arthur C. ClarkeGravity by Erica WagnerDon’t Panic by Neil GaimanCrisis on Conshelf Ten by Monica HughesThe Fault in our Stars by John Green
2.The Ocean at the End of the Lane by Neil GaimanWhere the Sidewalk Ends by Shel Silverstein
3.The Archived by Victoria SchwabPaper Towns by John GreenIn the Land of Invented Languages by Arika Okrent
4.Fangirl by Rainbow RowellThe Statistical Probability of Love at First Sight by Jennifer E. Smith
5.Real Men Don’t Rehearse by Justin LockeThe Elements of Style by William Strunk and E.B. White
6.The Graveyard Book by Neil GaimanSum, forty tales from the afterlives by David EaglemanAfterworlds by Scott Westerfeld
ZoomInfo
lyriclorelei:

Sorted Books, Part II
Decided to not only make poems with friends’ books, but also my own for the Thirteenth Art Assignment.
1.The Ultimate Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy by Douglas Adams2001, A Space Odyssey by Arthur C. ClarkeGravity by Erica WagnerDon’t Panic by Neil GaimanCrisis on Conshelf Ten by Monica HughesThe Fault in our Stars by John Green
2.The Ocean at the End of the Lane by Neil GaimanWhere the Sidewalk Ends by Shel Silverstein
3.The Archived by Victoria SchwabPaper Towns by John GreenIn the Land of Invented Languages by Arika Okrent
4.Fangirl by Rainbow RowellThe Statistical Probability of Love at First Sight by Jennifer E. Smith
5.Real Men Don’t Rehearse by Justin LockeThe Elements of Style by William Strunk and E.B. White
6.The Graveyard Book by Neil GaimanSum, forty tales from the afterlives by David EaglemanAfterworlds by Scott Westerfeld
ZoomInfo
lyriclorelei:

Sorted Books, Part II
Decided to not only make poems with friends’ books, but also my own for the Thirteenth Art Assignment.
1.The Ultimate Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy by Douglas Adams2001, A Space Odyssey by Arthur C. ClarkeGravity by Erica WagnerDon’t Panic by Neil GaimanCrisis on Conshelf Ten by Monica HughesThe Fault in our Stars by John Green
2.The Ocean at the End of the Lane by Neil GaimanWhere the Sidewalk Ends by Shel Silverstein
3.The Archived by Victoria SchwabPaper Towns by John GreenIn the Land of Invented Languages by Arika Okrent
4.Fangirl by Rainbow RowellThe Statistical Probability of Love at First Sight by Jennifer E. Smith
5.Real Men Don’t Rehearse by Justin LockeThe Elements of Style by William Strunk and E.B. White
6.The Graveyard Book by Neil GaimanSum, forty tales from the afterlives by David EaglemanAfterworlds by Scott Westerfeld
ZoomInfo
lyriclorelei:

Sorted Books, Part II
Decided to not only make poems with friends’ books, but also my own for the Thirteenth Art Assignment.
1.The Ultimate Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy by Douglas Adams2001, A Space Odyssey by Arthur C. ClarkeGravity by Erica WagnerDon’t Panic by Neil GaimanCrisis on Conshelf Ten by Monica HughesThe Fault in our Stars by John Green
2.The Ocean at the End of the Lane by Neil GaimanWhere the Sidewalk Ends by Shel Silverstein
3.The Archived by Victoria SchwabPaper Towns by John GreenIn the Land of Invented Languages by Arika Okrent
4.Fangirl by Rainbow RowellThe Statistical Probability of Love at First Sight by Jennifer E. Smith
5.Real Men Don’t Rehearse by Justin LockeThe Elements of Style by William Strunk and E.B. White
6.The Graveyard Book by Neil GaimanSum, forty tales from the afterlives by David EaglemanAfterworlds by Scott Westerfeld
ZoomInfo
lyriclorelei:

Sorted Books, Part II
Decided to not only make poems with friends’ books, but also my own for the Thirteenth Art Assignment.
1.The Ultimate Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy by Douglas Adams2001, A Space Odyssey by Arthur C. ClarkeGravity by Erica WagnerDon’t Panic by Neil GaimanCrisis on Conshelf Ten by Monica HughesThe Fault in our Stars by John Green
2.The Ocean at the End of the Lane by Neil GaimanWhere the Sidewalk Ends by Shel Silverstein
3.The Archived by Victoria SchwabPaper Towns by John GreenIn the Land of Invented Languages by Arika Okrent
4.Fangirl by Rainbow RowellThe Statistical Probability of Love at First Sight by Jennifer E. Smith
5.Real Men Don’t Rehearse by Justin LockeThe Elements of Style by William Strunk and E.B. White
6.The Graveyard Book by Neil GaimanSum, forty tales from the afterlives by David EaglemanAfterworlds by Scott Westerfeld
ZoomInfo
lyriclorelei:

Sorted Books, Part II
Decided to not only make poems with friends’ books, but also my own for the Thirteenth Art Assignment.
1.The Ultimate Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy by Douglas Adams2001, A Space Odyssey by Arthur C. ClarkeGravity by Erica WagnerDon’t Panic by Neil GaimanCrisis on Conshelf Ten by Monica HughesThe Fault in our Stars by John Green
2.The Ocean at the End of the Lane by Neil GaimanWhere the Sidewalk Ends by Shel Silverstein
3.The Archived by Victoria SchwabPaper Towns by John GreenIn the Land of Invented Languages by Arika Okrent
4.Fangirl by Rainbow RowellThe Statistical Probability of Love at First Sight by Jennifer E. Smith
5.Real Men Don’t Rehearse by Justin LockeThe Elements of Style by William Strunk and E.B. White
6.The Graveyard Book by Neil GaimanSum, forty tales from the afterlives by David EaglemanAfterworlds by Scott Westerfeld
ZoomInfo

lyriclorelei:

Sorted Books, Part II

Decided to not only make poems with friends’ books, but also my own for the Thirteenth Art Assignment.

1.
The Ultimate Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy by Douglas Adams
2001, A Space Odyssey by Arthur C. Clarke
Gravity by Erica Wagner
Don’t Panic by Neil Gaiman
Crisis on Conshelf Ten by Monica Hughes
The Fault in our Stars by John Green

2.
The Ocean at the End of the Lane by Neil Gaiman
Where the Sidewalk Ends by Shel Silverstein

3.
The Archived by Victoria Schwab
Paper Towns by John Green
In the Land of Invented Languages by Arika Okrent

4.
Fangirl by Rainbow Rowell
The Statistical Probability of Love at First Sight by Jennifer E. Smith

5.
Real Men Don’t Rehearse by Justin Locke
The Elements of Style by William Strunk and E.B. White

6.
The Graveyard Book by Neil Gaiman
Sum, forty tales from the afterlives by David Eagleman
Afterworlds by Scott Westerfeld

learntolovewell:

the art assignment #13, sorted books (self portrait)
i. the reader, inkspell, (ella) enchanted, inkheart       a reflection of my inner self— i learned to read young because my older sister could and i was jealous, but soon fell under under the spell of words, and ended up with an ink heart (incidentally, ella enchanted has been my favorite book since i was young)
ii. the wish: how to be an explorer of the world (the sweet far thing)       in my family we travel often, and since i was young i have loved visiting and learning about new places, and i hope to continue to do so throughout my life. the last phrase i included because no matter how much you see, there is always more, more to see, to experience, to chase into forever. 
iii. a song for summer ever burning bright       i am a child of summer, born in july, and summer holds my favorite things— sunshine, river days, summer camp, wildflowers, family time, and more summer camp. 
for this assignment, i started off trying to finding titles that were simple enough to fit into a set, but still interesting on their own, and still tried to include some of my favorite books. the assignment was really enjoyable, but it was still challenging to find reflections of myself on my bookshelves. i found many pairings that told stories, but not all of them were mine. in the end i came up with the three above that reflected my personality, and several others that aren’t pictured. 
the books that we keep close to us; the ones we break the spines of and sleep with, fingers curled around their pages, that we know every word of yet we read them again and again, those are the books that are part of our souls. and those are the ones that we find in this project, ones that speak to us both with their titles and the stories inside— 
ZoomInfo
learntolovewell:

the art assignment #13, sorted books (self portrait)
i. the reader, inkspell, (ella) enchanted, inkheart       a reflection of my inner self— i learned to read young because my older sister could and i was jealous, but soon fell under under the spell of words, and ended up with an ink heart (incidentally, ella enchanted has been my favorite book since i was young)
ii. the wish: how to be an explorer of the world (the sweet far thing)       in my family we travel often, and since i was young i have loved visiting and learning about new places, and i hope to continue to do so throughout my life. the last phrase i included because no matter how much you see, there is always more, more to see, to experience, to chase into forever. 
iii. a song for summer ever burning bright       i am a child of summer, born in july, and summer holds my favorite things— sunshine, river days, summer camp, wildflowers, family time, and more summer camp. 
for this assignment, i started off trying to finding titles that were simple enough to fit into a set, but still interesting on their own, and still tried to include some of my favorite books. the assignment was really enjoyable, but it was still challenging to find reflections of myself on my bookshelves. i found many pairings that told stories, but not all of them were mine. in the end i came up with the three above that reflected my personality, and several others that aren’t pictured. 
the books that we keep close to us; the ones we break the spines of and sleep with, fingers curled around their pages, that we know every word of yet we read them again and again, those are the books that are part of our souls. and those are the ones that we find in this project, ones that speak to us both with their titles and the stories inside— 
ZoomInfo
learntolovewell:

the art assignment #13, sorted books (self portrait)
i. the reader, inkspell, (ella) enchanted, inkheart       a reflection of my inner self— i learned to read young because my older sister could and i was jealous, but soon fell under under the spell of words, and ended up with an ink heart (incidentally, ella enchanted has been my favorite book since i was young)
ii. the wish: how to be an explorer of the world (the sweet far thing)       in my family we travel often, and since i was young i have loved visiting and learning about new places, and i hope to continue to do so throughout my life. the last phrase i included because no matter how much you see, there is always more, more to see, to experience, to chase into forever. 
iii. a song for summer ever burning bright       i am a child of summer, born in july, and summer holds my favorite things— sunshine, river days, summer camp, wildflowers, family time, and more summer camp. 
for this assignment, i started off trying to finding titles that were simple enough to fit into a set, but still interesting on their own, and still tried to include some of my favorite books. the assignment was really enjoyable, but it was still challenging to find reflections of myself on my bookshelves. i found many pairings that told stories, but not all of them were mine. in the end i came up with the three above that reflected my personality, and several others that aren’t pictured. 
the books that we keep close to us; the ones we break the spines of and sleep with, fingers curled around their pages, that we know every word of yet we read them again and again, those are the books that are part of our souls. and those are the ones that we find in this project, ones that speak to us both with their titles and the stories inside— 
ZoomInfo

learntolovewell:

the art assignment #13, sorted books (self portrait)

i. the reader, inkspell, (ella) enchanted, inkheart
       a reflection of my inner self— i learned to read young because my older sister could and i was jealous, but soon fell under under the spell of words, and ended up with an ink heart (incidentally, ella enchanted has been my favorite book since i was young)

ii. the wish: how to be an explorer of the world (the sweet far thing)
       in my family we travel often, and since i was young i have loved visiting and learning about new places, and i hope to continue to do so throughout my life. the last phrase i included because no matter how much you see, there is always more, more to see, to experience, to chase into forever. 

iii. a song for summer ever burning bright
       i am a child of summer, born in july, and summer holds my favorite things— sunshine, river days, summer camp, wildflowers, family time, and more summer camp. 

for this assignment, i started off trying to finding titles that were simple enough to fit into a set, but still interesting on their own, and still tried to include some of my favorite books. the assignment was really enjoyable, but it was still challenging to find reflections of myself on my bookshelves. i found many pairings that told stories, but not all of them were mine. in the end i came up with the three above that reflected my personality, and several others that aren’t pictured. 

the books that we keep close to us; the ones we break the spines of and sleep with, fingers curled around their pages, that we know every word of yet we read them again and again, those are the books that are part of our souls. and those are the ones that we find in this project, ones that speak to us both with their titles and the stories inside— 

jethro-harrup:

A Portrait of my friend Georgie.
I encountered her rather eclectic book collection at the end of a summer spent packing second hand books in a large book warehouse; so it was great to see books as books again rather than regular polygons that I have to handle a few thousand a day of.
ZoomInfo
jethro-harrup:

A Portrait of my friend Georgie.
I encountered her rather eclectic book collection at the end of a summer spent packing second hand books in a large book warehouse; so it was great to see books as books again rather than regular polygons that I have to handle a few thousand a day of.
ZoomInfo
jethro-harrup:

A Portrait of my friend Georgie.
I encountered her rather eclectic book collection at the end of a summer spent packing second hand books in a large book warehouse; so it was great to see books as books again rather than regular polygons that I have to handle a few thousand a day of.
ZoomInfo

jethro-harrup:

A Portrait of my friend Georgie.

I encountered her rather eclectic book collection at the end of a summer spent packing second hand books in a large book warehouse; so it was great to see books as books again rather than regular polygons that I have to handle a few thousand a day of.

defineproductive:

My girlfriend Gaby, who is not on tumblr (yet), did the sorted books art assignment too, using the books she’s collected in her room through her childhood. I particularly like her last one:
When Things Fall Apart
This Side of Paradise
To the Lighthouse
South of the Border, West of the Sun
Dinner at the Homesick Restaurant
ZoomInfo
defineproductive:

My girlfriend Gaby, who is not on tumblr (yet), did the sorted books art assignment too, using the books she’s collected in her room through her childhood. I particularly like her last one:
When Things Fall Apart
This Side of Paradise
To the Lighthouse
South of the Border, West of the Sun
Dinner at the Homesick Restaurant
ZoomInfo
defineproductive:

My girlfriend Gaby, who is not on tumblr (yet), did the sorted books art assignment too, using the books she’s collected in her room through her childhood. I particularly like her last one:
When Things Fall Apart
This Side of Paradise
To the Lighthouse
South of the Border, West of the Sun
Dinner at the Homesick Restaurant
ZoomInfo
defineproductive:

My girlfriend Gaby, who is not on tumblr (yet), did the sorted books art assignment too, using the books she’s collected in her room through her childhood. I particularly like her last one:
When Things Fall Apart
This Side of Paradise
To the Lighthouse
South of the Border, West of the Sun
Dinner at the Homesick Restaurant
ZoomInfo

defineproductive:

My girlfriend Gaby, who is not on tumblr (yet), did the sorted books art assignment too, using the books she’s collected in her room through her childhood. I particularly like her last one:

When Things Fall Apart

This Side of Paradise

To the Lighthouse

South of the Border, West of the Sun

Dinner at the Homesick Restaurant

theartassignmentresponses:

phe_star
My first play around with the book stacking art assignment. I believe you can always know yourself and your partner better, so this piece has a collection of Sean’s books in the first frame, mine at the bottom and a combination of both our books in the middle frame. #theartassignment

theartassignmentresponses:

phe_star

My first play around with the book stacking art assignment. I believe you can always know yourself and your partner better, so this piece has a collection of Sean’s books in the first frame, mine at the bottom and a combination of both our books in the middle frame. #theartassignment