kayquimi:

I guess this isn’t technically me doing an Art Assignment— I didn’t create either of these art pieces myself— but watching Lauren Zoll’s assignment video "Off" made me think of my recent visit to the St. Louis Art Museum, and these two particular installations in their Contemporary Art section. It took me several minutes of staring at the first piece, Frank Stella’s “Marriage of Reason and Squalor”, to confirm that the subtly shifting color was not the paint itself, but the light of the second piece, Dan Flavin’s “untitled”, reflecting off it from an opposite corner of the room. And it was just so fascinating, the way these two separate works of art wind up interacting with each other (and with the viewer, as her moving position between the two changes the angles of the reflections), even though they were made by different artists who likely never anticipated them interacting in such a way, simply by proximity.
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kayquimi:

I guess this isn’t technically me doing an Art Assignment— I didn’t create either of these art pieces myself— but watching Lauren Zoll’s assignment video "Off" made me think of my recent visit to the St. Louis Art Museum, and these two particular installations in their Contemporary Art section. It took me several minutes of staring at the first piece, Frank Stella’s “Marriage of Reason and Squalor”, to confirm that the subtly shifting color was not the paint itself, but the light of the second piece, Dan Flavin’s “untitled”, reflecting off it from an opposite corner of the room. And it was just so fascinating, the way these two separate works of art wind up interacting with each other (and with the viewer, as her moving position between the two changes the angles of the reflections), even though they were made by different artists who likely never anticipated them interacting in such a way, simply by proximity.
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kayquimi:

I guess this isn’t technically me doing an Art Assignment— I didn’t create either of these art pieces myself— but watching Lauren Zoll’s assignment video "Off" made me think of my recent visit to the St. Louis Art Museum, and these two particular installations in their Contemporary Art section. It took me several minutes of staring at the first piece, Frank Stella’s “Marriage of Reason and Squalor”, to confirm that the subtly shifting color was not the paint itself, but the light of the second piece, Dan Flavin’s “untitled”, reflecting off it from an opposite corner of the room. And it was just so fascinating, the way these two separate works of art wind up interacting with each other (and with the viewer, as her moving position between the two changes the angles of the reflections), even though they were made by different artists who likely never anticipated them interacting in such a way, simply by proximity.
ZoomInfo
kayquimi:

I guess this isn’t technically me doing an Art Assignment— I didn’t create either of these art pieces myself— but watching Lauren Zoll’s assignment video "Off" made me think of my recent visit to the St. Louis Art Museum, and these two particular installations in their Contemporary Art section. It took me several minutes of staring at the first piece, Frank Stella’s “Marriage of Reason and Squalor”, to confirm that the subtly shifting color was not the paint itself, but the light of the second piece, Dan Flavin’s “untitled”, reflecting off it from an opposite corner of the room. And it was just so fascinating, the way these two separate works of art wind up interacting with each other (and with the viewer, as her moving position between the two changes the angles of the reflections), even though they were made by different artists who likely never anticipated them interacting in such a way, simply by proximity.
ZoomInfo

kayquimi:

I guess this isn’t technically me doing an Art Assignment— I didn’t create either of these art pieces myself— but watching Lauren Zoll’s assignment video "Off" made me think of my recent visit to the St. Louis Art Museum, and these two particular installations in their Contemporary Art section. It took me several minutes of staring at the first piece, Frank Stella’s “Marriage of Reason and Squalor”, to confirm that the subtly shifting color was not the paint itself, but the light of the second piece, Dan Flavin’s “untitled”, reflecting off it from an opposite corner of the room. And it was just so fascinating, the way these two separate works of art wind up interacting with each other (and with the viewer, as her moving position between the two changes the angles of the reflections), even though they were made by different artists who likely never anticipated them interacting in such a way, simply by proximity.

onceuponaspacetime:

Doing some mono printing for @theartassignment ‘Imprint’.
More information and pictures to come later. Pretty proud and excited about this one. (Also extremely excited to be seeing Salman Rushdie’s talk in a couple of weeks!)

onceuponaspacetime:

Doing some mono printing for @theartassignment ‘Imprint’.

More information and pictures to come later. Pretty proud and excited about this one. (Also extremely excited to be seeing Salman Rushdie’s talk in a couple of weeks!)

anywiebs:

Air Guitar by Dave Hickey

I like that this book is the first in The Art Assignment Book Club. I learned a bit and it helped me gain some confidence in a field I rarely feel qualified in. I really enjoy participating in this project and am looking forward to the next book.

Want to see someone do a much better job than we did reviewing Dave Hickey’s Air Guitar? Watch Wiebke! 

(Source: youtube.com)

nanofishology:

Back in 2006, I went on a mission to accumulate ties. The project I had in mind was to stitch them together, side by side, and make a dress out of them. I worked at a thrift store, so I got a discount on the grab bags of ties we put out when they failed to sell individually. However, despite obtaining more than enough to make the dress, I just never got around to making it, and have been hauling around a ton of them for the past 8 years.
When I saw the “Make a Rug” assignment (from theartassignment), I knew I had to do it. Textiles are my babies, and my love for knitting has resulted in needing physical therapy at one point (tension matters, folks!). Initially, I thought about using up some yarn to make my rug. This assignment came out right as I was moving, and when I unearthed my box of ties, I knew what I had to do.
First, I arranged them in a color gradient, then stitched the ends together (skinny end to skinny end). The resulting ball of ties was massive and heavy. I had to start over a few times—the thick-and-thin parts made it very challenging at the beginning. Once I got going, this thing was done in no time. It ended up being smaller than I anticipated, but now I have a very thick, comfy, 99% silk rag rug to sit on in my new living room.
My favorite thing about this project is the modularity. When I move to a bigger space, all I have to do to make a larger rug is buy more ties and add onto the end.
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nanofishology:

Back in 2006, I went on a mission to accumulate ties. The project I had in mind was to stitch them together, side by side, and make a dress out of them. I worked at a thrift store, so I got a discount on the grab bags of ties we put out when they failed to sell individually. However, despite obtaining more than enough to make the dress, I just never got around to making it, and have been hauling around a ton of them for the past 8 years.
When I saw the “Make a Rug” assignment (from theartassignment), I knew I had to do it. Textiles are my babies, and my love for knitting has resulted in needing physical therapy at one point (tension matters, folks!). Initially, I thought about using up some yarn to make my rug. This assignment came out right as I was moving, and when I unearthed my box of ties, I knew what I had to do.
First, I arranged them in a color gradient, then stitched the ends together (skinny end to skinny end). The resulting ball of ties was massive and heavy. I had to start over a few times—the thick-and-thin parts made it very challenging at the beginning. Once I got going, this thing was done in no time. It ended up being smaller than I anticipated, but now I have a very thick, comfy, 99% silk rag rug to sit on in my new living room.
My favorite thing about this project is the modularity. When I move to a bigger space, all I have to do to make a larger rug is buy more ties and add onto the end.
ZoomInfo
nanofishology:

Back in 2006, I went on a mission to accumulate ties. The project I had in mind was to stitch them together, side by side, and make a dress out of them. I worked at a thrift store, so I got a discount on the grab bags of ties we put out when they failed to sell individually. However, despite obtaining more than enough to make the dress, I just never got around to making it, and have been hauling around a ton of them for the past 8 years.
When I saw the “Make a Rug” assignment (from theartassignment), I knew I had to do it. Textiles are my babies, and my love for knitting has resulted in needing physical therapy at one point (tension matters, folks!). Initially, I thought about using up some yarn to make my rug. This assignment came out right as I was moving, and when I unearthed my box of ties, I knew what I had to do.
First, I arranged them in a color gradient, then stitched the ends together (skinny end to skinny end). The resulting ball of ties was massive and heavy. I had to start over a few times—the thick-and-thin parts made it very challenging at the beginning. Once I got going, this thing was done in no time. It ended up being smaller than I anticipated, but now I have a very thick, comfy, 99% silk rag rug to sit on in my new living room.
My favorite thing about this project is the modularity. When I move to a bigger space, all I have to do to make a larger rug is buy more ties and add onto the end.
ZoomInfo
nanofishology:

Back in 2006, I went on a mission to accumulate ties. The project I had in mind was to stitch them together, side by side, and make a dress out of them. I worked at a thrift store, so I got a discount on the grab bags of ties we put out when they failed to sell individually. However, despite obtaining more than enough to make the dress, I just never got around to making it, and have been hauling around a ton of them for the past 8 years.
When I saw the “Make a Rug” assignment (from theartassignment), I knew I had to do it. Textiles are my babies, and my love for knitting has resulted in needing physical therapy at one point (tension matters, folks!). Initially, I thought about using up some yarn to make my rug. This assignment came out right as I was moving, and when I unearthed my box of ties, I knew what I had to do.
First, I arranged them in a color gradient, then stitched the ends together (skinny end to skinny end). The resulting ball of ties was massive and heavy. I had to start over a few times—the thick-and-thin parts made it very challenging at the beginning. Once I got going, this thing was done in no time. It ended up being smaller than I anticipated, but now I have a very thick, comfy, 99% silk rag rug to sit on in my new living room.
My favorite thing about this project is the modularity. When I move to a bigger space, all I have to do to make a larger rug is buy more ties and add onto the end.
ZoomInfo
nanofishology:

Back in 2006, I went on a mission to accumulate ties. The project I had in mind was to stitch them together, side by side, and make a dress out of them. I worked at a thrift store, so I got a discount on the grab bags of ties we put out when they failed to sell individually. However, despite obtaining more than enough to make the dress, I just never got around to making it, and have been hauling around a ton of them for the past 8 years.
When I saw the “Make a Rug” assignment (from theartassignment), I knew I had to do it. Textiles are my babies, and my love for knitting has resulted in needing physical therapy at one point (tension matters, folks!). Initially, I thought about using up some yarn to make my rug. This assignment came out right as I was moving, and when I unearthed my box of ties, I knew what I had to do.
First, I arranged them in a color gradient, then stitched the ends together (skinny end to skinny end). The resulting ball of ties was massive and heavy. I had to start over a few times—the thick-and-thin parts made it very challenging at the beginning. Once I got going, this thing was done in no time. It ended up being smaller than I anticipated, but now I have a very thick, comfy, 99% silk rag rug to sit on in my new living room.
My favorite thing about this project is the modularity. When I move to a bigger space, all I have to do to make a larger rug is buy more ties and add onto the end.
ZoomInfo
nanofishology:

Back in 2006, I went on a mission to accumulate ties. The project I had in mind was to stitch them together, side by side, and make a dress out of them. I worked at a thrift store, so I got a discount on the grab bags of ties we put out when they failed to sell individually. However, despite obtaining more than enough to make the dress, I just never got around to making it, and have been hauling around a ton of them for the past 8 years.
When I saw the “Make a Rug” assignment (from theartassignment), I knew I had to do it. Textiles are my babies, and my love for knitting has resulted in needing physical therapy at one point (tension matters, folks!). Initially, I thought about using up some yarn to make my rug. This assignment came out right as I was moving, and when I unearthed my box of ties, I knew what I had to do.
First, I arranged them in a color gradient, then stitched the ends together (skinny end to skinny end). The resulting ball of ties was massive and heavy. I had to start over a few times—the thick-and-thin parts made it very challenging at the beginning. Once I got going, this thing was done in no time. It ended up being smaller than I anticipated, but now I have a very thick, comfy, 99% silk rag rug to sit on in my new living room.
My favorite thing about this project is the modularity. When I move to a bigger space, all I have to do to make a larger rug is buy more ties and add onto the end.
ZoomInfo

nanofishology:

Back in 2006, I went on a mission to accumulate ties. The project I had in mind was to stitch them together, side by side, and make a dress out of them. I worked at a thrift store, so I got a discount on the grab bags of ties we put out when they failed to sell individually. However, despite obtaining more than enough to make the dress, I just never got around to making it, and have been hauling around a ton of them for the past 8 years.

When I saw the “Make a Rug” assignment (from theartassignment), I knew I had to do it. Textiles are my babies, and my love for knitting has resulted in needing physical therapy at one point (tension matters, folks!). Initially, I thought about using up some yarn to make my rug. This assignment came out right as I was moving, and when I unearthed my box of ties, I knew what I had to do.

First, I arranged them in a color gradient, then stitched the ends together (skinny end to skinny end). The resulting ball of ties was massive and heavy. I had to start over a few times—the thick-and-thin parts made it very challenging at the beginning. Once I got going, this thing was done in no time. It ended up being smaller than I anticipated, but now I have a very thick, comfy, 99% silk rag rug to sit on in my new living room.

My favorite thing about this project is the modularity. When I move to a bigger space, all I have to do to make a larger rug is buy more ties and add onto the end.

nikki-rook:

When I was waiting for a photo opportunity to happen I was suddenly inspired by the art assignment Off. A little different than an electronic device, but the same way you can get stuck behind a phone or computer, you can get stuck behind a camera. So I took this, and the blurred reflection of lights looked the best out several photos.

Wow—super nice Off execution. In a camera lens!

nikki-rook:

When I was waiting for a photo opportunity to happen I was suddenly inspired by the art assignment Off. A little different than an electronic device, but the same way you can get stuck behind a phone or computer, you can get stuck behind a camera. So I took this, and the blurred reflection of lights looked the best out several photos.

Wow—super nice Off execution. In a camera lens!

lifeisprettybeautiful:

I really loved this art assignment! The ds really added a childish detail, and so I decided to reflect my swing set. I liked how they turned out.

Oh, now that is a fantastic use of an old nintendo DS…
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lifeisprettybeautiful:

I really loved this art assignment! The ds really added a childish detail, and so I decided to reflect my swing set. I liked how they turned out.

Oh, now that is a fantastic use of an old nintendo DS…
ZoomInfo

lifeisprettybeautiful:

I really loved this art assignment! The ds really added a childish detail, and so I decided to reflect my swing set. I liked how they turned out.

Oh, now that is a fantastic use of an old nintendo DS…

anywiebs:

When I first saw the Art Assignment 9. Off, I turned off all the screens in my apartment and took pictures. What struck me was not that they all worked perfectly fine as mirrors, but how depressing some of the scenes they reflected were.
For example the empty couch in front of my TV looked so lost and the TV itself seemed rather sad. Somehow devoid of function and therefore meaningless.
Next I tried to follow the instructions and create a colorful scene in front of a screen to get a happy image. But the reflection remained clear and only looked more depressing, as if I was trying to entertain my TV.
Thus I forgot the assignment, until I was at the North Sea the other day. There I remembered the black mirrors people used to look at the sights, as the wind was pretty strong, coming from the Ocean, and it was difficult to face the water. So I thought, I could turn around and use my tablet as a mirror to look at the lighthouse.
And this is the picture I (or rather my brother) took.

anywiebs:

When I first saw the Art Assignment 9. Off, I turned off all the screens in my apartment and took pictures. What struck me was not that they all worked perfectly fine as mirrors, but how depressing some of the scenes they reflected were.

For example the empty couch in front of my TV looked so lost and the TV itself seemed rather sad. Somehow devoid of function and therefore meaningless.

Next I tried to follow the instructions and create a colorful scene in front of a screen to get a happy image. But the reflection remained clear and only looked more depressing, as if I was trying to entertain my TV.

Thus I forgot the assignment, until I was at the North Sea the other day. There I remembered the black mirrors people used to look at the sights, as the wind was pretty strong, coming from the Ocean, and it was difficult to face the water. So I thought, I could turn around and use my tablet as a mirror to look at the lighthouse.

And this is the picture I (or rather my brother) took.

Here John and I are talking about Dave Hickey’s Air Guitar. We promise, you don’t have to have actually read it to get something out of the video. But you should still read the book!

Let us know what you think—we’d love to hear your reactions to the ideas we discuss this week, as well as your suggestions for future book club videos. What didn’t we cover that you wish we had? What did we cover that you wish we hadn’t?

rsthomason:

These pictures show my final takes - for now - on the Imprint art assignment, where overlaid acrylic printings are taken from a sawn-up hardback. The paint was quite thin and that, together with the printing pressure, made the book slowly disintegrate. It was an interesting experience, using a book to tell an entirely wordless story
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rsthomason:

These pictures show my final takes - for now - on the Imprint art assignment, where overlaid acrylic printings are taken from a sawn-up hardback. The paint was quite thin and that, together with the printing pressure, made the book slowly disintegrate. It was an interesting experience, using a book to tell an entirely wordless story
ZoomInfo
rsthomason:

These pictures show my final takes - for now - on the Imprint art assignment, where overlaid acrylic printings are taken from a sawn-up hardback. The paint was quite thin and that, together with the printing pressure, made the book slowly disintegrate. It was an interesting experience, using a book to tell an entirely wordless story
ZoomInfo
rsthomason:

These pictures show my final takes - for now - on the Imprint art assignment, where overlaid acrylic printings are taken from a sawn-up hardback. The paint was quite thin and that, together with the printing pressure, made the book slowly disintegrate. It was an interesting experience, using a book to tell an entirely wordless story
ZoomInfo
rsthomason:

These pictures show my final takes - for now - on the Imprint art assignment, where overlaid acrylic printings are taken from a sawn-up hardback. The paint was quite thin and that, together with the printing pressure, made the book slowly disintegrate. It was an interesting experience, using a book to tell an entirely wordless story
ZoomInfo

rsthomason:

These pictures show my final takes - for now - on the Imprint art assignment, where overlaid acrylic printings are taken from a sawn-up hardback. The paint was quite thin and that, together with the printing pressure, made the book slowly disintegrate. It was an interesting experience, using a book to tell an entirely wordless story

13. Remake - Bron Loverichhttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BndX1oMzPPo

jonlovesart:

theartassignment - Couldn’t decide which assignment to try, so we made our own assignment.

Our first parody! Imitation is the sincerest form of flattery, and these guys did it rather well. Especially love my hair in this. And the sound effects. Your execution of the theme music we call “Happy Clappy” is astounding. And a good assignment to boot! Please enjoy…

formymemory:

Subbmission of Assignment #12 (Imprint) to theartassignment.
Burning Candle by Theresa K.
(Acrylic on Mayfair)
I thought of an item that I was interested in and thought of how paint could express something about it. In turn, I picked a tea-light candle.
Vertically I cut it in half, removed the wick, and began my print. Using a mixture of acrylic reds and yellows (the colours of flames), I tried to make a candle burn without any fire. 
I think it turned out well. It made me happy to see the spots which were left white by the imperfect cut of the wax. The colours look great and I think it turned out better than expected - I lit a candle up with colour without the use of fire.
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formymemory:

Subbmission of Assignment #12 (Imprint) to theartassignment.
Burning Candle by Theresa K.
(Acrylic on Mayfair)
I thought of an item that I was interested in and thought of how paint could express something about it. In turn, I picked a tea-light candle.
Vertically I cut it in half, removed the wick, and began my print. Using a mixture of acrylic reds and yellows (the colours of flames), I tried to make a candle burn without any fire. 
I think it turned out well. It made me happy to see the spots which were left white by the imperfect cut of the wax. The colours look great and I think it turned out better than expected - I lit a candle up with colour without the use of fire.
ZoomInfo

formymemory:

Subbmission of Assignment #12 (Imprint) to theartassignment.

Burning Candle by Theresa K.

(Acrylic on Mayfair)

I thought of an item that I was interested in and thought of how paint could express something about it. In turn, I picked a tea-light candle.

Vertically I cut it in half, removed the wick, and began my print. Using a mixture of acrylic reds and yellows (the colours of flames), I tried to make a candle burn without any fire. 

I think it turned out well. It made me happy to see the spots which were left white by the imperfect cut of the wax. The colours look great and I think it turned out better than expected - I lit a candle up with colour without the use of fire.

rachaelmakesthings:

I found a small calculator in my room and disassembled it, which yielded 5 distinct pieces: the back, the keys, the front (in blue), the key pad (in red), and the motherboard/screen/battery (in yellow).
Going into this, I didn’t really have a plan; I’m pretty sure I got sidetracked by the excitement of whoa this is what’s in a calculator?! In retrospect, I maybe should’ve thought this out a little better instead of plopping things down where they felt best, but I don’t think it turned out too badly. The key pad, in red, reminds me of a tire track and I like that the front part of the calculator, in blue, is vaguely tardis-y.

Great low-tech use of a high tech (at least it was once) object. 
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rachaelmakesthings:

I found a small calculator in my room and disassembled it, which yielded 5 distinct pieces: the back, the keys, the front (in blue), the key pad (in red), and the motherboard/screen/battery (in yellow).
Going into this, I didn’t really have a plan; I’m pretty sure I got sidetracked by the excitement of whoa this is what’s in a calculator?! In retrospect, I maybe should’ve thought this out a little better instead of plopping things down where they felt best, but I don’t think it turned out too badly. The key pad, in red, reminds me of a tire track and I like that the front part of the calculator, in blue, is vaguely tardis-y.

Great low-tech use of a high tech (at least it was once) object. 
ZoomInfo
rachaelmakesthings:

I found a small calculator in my room and disassembled it, which yielded 5 distinct pieces: the back, the keys, the front (in blue), the key pad (in red), and the motherboard/screen/battery (in yellow).
Going into this, I didn’t really have a plan; I’m pretty sure I got sidetracked by the excitement of whoa this is what’s in a calculator?! In retrospect, I maybe should’ve thought this out a little better instead of plopping things down where they felt best, but I don’t think it turned out too badly. The key pad, in red, reminds me of a tire track and I like that the front part of the calculator, in blue, is vaguely tardis-y.

Great low-tech use of a high tech (at least it was once) object. 
ZoomInfo

rachaelmakesthings:

I found a small calculator in my room and disassembled it, which yielded 5 distinct pieces: the back, the keys, the front (in blue), the key pad (in red), and the motherboard/screen/battery (in yellow).

Going into this, I didn’t really have a plan; I’m pretty sure I got sidetracked by the excitement of whoa this is what’s in a calculator?! In retrospect, I maybe should’ve thought this out a little better instead of plopping things down where they felt best, but I don’t think it turned out too badly. The key pad, in red, reminds me of a tire track and I like that the front part of the calculator, in blue, is vaguely tardis-y.

Great low-tech use of a high tech (at least it was once) object. 

"This is entitled Blue Box. It’s about the Civil War. Obviously.” 

This ad is immensely enjoyable. Poehler’s gallerist is dead on. Of course ALL gallerists aren’t like this. There are wonderful, intelligent, and deeply committed people working in galleries, but the reputation exists for a reason. 

rsthomason:

My first two pieces from the Imprint art assignment. At top - and before I had a chance to watch the whole video - you can see a slice of tree I took from my garden, which meant that an hour and a half with an old saw gave me a printing surface that is much too large if we’re following the brief strictly. Not doing that is also fine, as the saw marks and g rowth rings combine in fascinating ways. The last photo shows the sawed-in-half book I continued with, and the strangely-hatted figures it gave me. More to come!

The tree slice is really lovely! (Not to knock the book print.)
ZoomInfo
rsthomason:

My first two pieces from the Imprint art assignment. At top - and before I had a chance to watch the whole video - you can see a slice of tree I took from my garden, which meant that an hour and a half with an old saw gave me a printing surface that is much too large if we’re following the brief strictly. Not doing that is also fine, as the saw marks and g rowth rings combine in fascinating ways. The last photo shows the sawed-in-half book I continued with, and the strangely-hatted figures it gave me. More to come!

The tree slice is really lovely! (Not to knock the book print.)
ZoomInfo
rsthomason:

My first two pieces from the Imprint art assignment. At top - and before I had a chance to watch the whole video - you can see a slice of tree I took from my garden, which meant that an hour and a half with an old saw gave me a printing surface that is much too large if we’re following the brief strictly. Not doing that is also fine, as the saw marks and g rowth rings combine in fascinating ways. The last photo shows the sawed-in-half book I continued with, and the strangely-hatted figures it gave me. More to come!

The tree slice is really lovely! (Not to knock the book print.)
ZoomInfo

rsthomason:

My first two pieces from the Imprint art assignment. At top - and before I had a chance to watch the whole video - you can see a slice of tree I took from my garden, which meant that an hour and a half with an old saw gave me a printing surface that is much too large if we’re following the brief strictly. Not doing that is also fine, as the saw marks and g rowth rings combine in fascinating ways. The last photo shows the sawed-in-half book I continued with, and the strangely-hatted figures it gave me. More to come!

The tree slice is really lovely! (Not to knock the book print.)

artfullylost:

So for the Art Assignment ep.12 “Imprint” with Sopheap Pich we are asked to cut something in half and dip it in paint and then press it on paper to make an imprint. I happened to be cleaning out my fridge and came across an old pomegranate and a small piece of lettuce that was not edible anymore. The pomegranate was imprinted on this piece of poster paper that I covered in small strips of newspaper a couple of years ago and then hung on my wall like one year ago, I couldn’t get it down so I went ahead and did the imprint on the wall and it created the interesting drips. I should say the drips are actually pomegranate juice that leaked out when I pressed the fruit onto the paper, also if you look closely on a couple of the imprints you can see bits of the pomegranate that stuck to the paper:) all I can say is I hope it doesn’t attract ants lol. The lettuce was old and kinda rotten and had weird brown juices so that was kinda nasty to touch but I think that it made a really interesting pattern, I personally see two hands pressed down palm down but thats just me. It almost reminds me of a Rorschach test. What do YOU see in the lettuce print?
Sandra GamezEpisode 12- Imprint with Sopheap PichOld FoodShe/Her
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artfullylost:

So for the Art Assignment ep.12 “Imprint” with Sopheap Pich we are asked to cut something in half and dip it in paint and then press it on paper to make an imprint. I happened to be cleaning out my fridge and came across an old pomegranate and a small piece of lettuce that was not edible anymore. The pomegranate was imprinted on this piece of poster paper that I covered in small strips of newspaper a couple of years ago and then hung on my wall like one year ago, I couldn’t get it down so I went ahead and did the imprint on the wall and it created the interesting drips. I should say the drips are actually pomegranate juice that leaked out when I pressed the fruit onto the paper, also if you look closely on a couple of the imprints you can see bits of the pomegranate that stuck to the paper:) all I can say is I hope it doesn’t attract ants lol. The lettuce was old and kinda rotten and had weird brown juices so that was kinda nasty to touch but I think that it made a really interesting pattern, I personally see two hands pressed down palm down but thats just me. It almost reminds me of a Rorschach test. What do YOU see in the lettuce print?
Sandra GamezEpisode 12- Imprint with Sopheap PichOld FoodShe/Her
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artfullylost:

So for the Art Assignment ep.12 “Imprint” with Sopheap Pich we are asked to cut something in half and dip it in paint and then press it on paper to make an imprint. I happened to be cleaning out my fridge and came across an old pomegranate and a small piece of lettuce that was not edible anymore. The pomegranate was imprinted on this piece of poster paper that I covered in small strips of newspaper a couple of years ago and then hung on my wall like one year ago, I couldn’t get it down so I went ahead and did the imprint on the wall and it created the interesting drips. I should say the drips are actually pomegranate juice that leaked out when I pressed the fruit onto the paper, also if you look closely on a couple of the imprints you can see bits of the pomegranate that stuck to the paper:) all I can say is I hope it doesn’t attract ants lol. The lettuce was old and kinda rotten and had weird brown juices so that was kinda nasty to touch but I think that it made a really interesting pattern, I personally see two hands pressed down palm down but thats just me. It almost reminds me of a Rorschach test. What do YOU see in the lettuce print?

Sandra Gamez
Episode 12- Imprint with Sopheap Pich
Old Food
She/Her